CAUTION: Every animal is a unique being in a unique situation and what you see on these webpages is generic and general and may not specifically apply to your animal's situation. Any responses to questions through this website similarly cannot be as precise and informed as is possible in a face-to-face assessment. Accordingly, you should not rely on anything set forth herein as the last word, and you hold Helping Pets Behave harmless from any liability whatsoever based on your reliance on the information you receive through this website.

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Testimonial 14
We have a 15 month old Rhodesian Ridgeback, Stanley, and have had him since he was a puppy. We have had Rhodesian’s previously so we knew he would be a high energy strong willed project. We have spend countless hours working with Stanley and generally he is obedient and great to be around, especially for a 15 month old. The breeder did some things correctly and some other things well intended, but not necessarily in his best interest, causing some insecurities that we were at a roadblock to fix. We knew we needed a professional who would understand the big picture.
We could not have picked a better professional than Mary! She spent extra time with us on the first session working so we really understood what makes him anxious, what makes him calm and why. She really brought out all the stops with equipment to try, treat balls, exercise pens to allow Stanley to work through his anxieties and be confident on everything he does.
Stanley had us confused because most of the time he is extremely confident, as a typical Rhodesian, but Mary really understood that he becomes fearful and anxious in some situations. She worked with us to build his confidence by allowing him to focus on us and take the attention off everything else. I can not say enough positive things about working with Mary. She definitely has many tools in her back pocket and a wonderful understanding of dogs as individuals and their own positive and negative ways of doing things.
Stanley is like a different dog now that we understand him better. I wish Mary worked closer because we will definitely be visiting again for more training techniques. 
Michele G. from Warrenton, VA

Testimonial 14

We have a 15 month old Rhodesian Ridgeback, Stanley, and have had him since he was a puppy. We have had Rhodesian’s previously so we knew he would be a high energy strong willed project. We have spend countless hours working with Stanley and generally he is obedient and great to be around, especially for a 15 month old. The breeder did some things correctly and some other things well intended, but not necessarily in his best interest, causing some insecurities that we were at a roadblock to fix. We knew we needed a professional who would understand the big picture.

We could not have picked a better professional than Mary! She spent extra time with us on the first session working so we really understood what makes him anxious, what makes him calm and why. She really brought out all the stops with equipment to try, treat balls, exercise pens to allow Stanley to work through his anxieties and be confident on everything he does.

Stanley had us confused because most of the time he is extremely confident, as a typical Rhodesian, but Mary really understood that he becomes fearful and anxious in some situations. She worked with us to build his confidence by allowing him to focus on us and take the attention off everything else. I can not say enough positive things about working with Mary. She definitely has many tools in her back pocket and a wonderful understanding of dogs as individuals and their own positive and negative ways of doing things.

Stanley is like a different dog now that we understand him better. I wish Mary worked closer because we will definitely be visiting again for more training techniques. 

Michele G. from Warrenton, VA

CAUTION: Every animal is a unique being in a unique situation and what you see on these webpages is generic and general and may not specifically apply to your animal's situation. Any responses to questions through this website similarly cannot be as precise and informed as is possible in a face-to-face assessment. Accordingly, you should not rely on anything set forth herein as the last word, and you hold Helping Pets Behave harmless from any liability whatsoever based on your reliance on the information you receive through this website.

Testimonial Review Rhodesian Ridgeback

neurosciencestuff:

Moonwalker Flies Backing Up
Most land animals walk forward by default, but can switch to backward walking when they sense an obstacle or danger in the path ahead. The impulse to change walking direction is likely to be transmitted by descending neurons of the brain that control local motor circuits within the central nervous system. This neuronal input can change walking direction by adjusting the order or timing of individual leg movements.
Screening for flies with altered walking patterns
In the current study, Dickson and his team aimed to understand the fly’s change in walking direction at the cellular level. Using a novel technology known as thermogenetics, they were able to identify the neurons in the brain that cause a change in locomotion. Their studies involved screening large numbers of flies with it which specific neurons were activated by heat, producing certain behaviors only when warmed to 30°C, but not at 24°C . Analysing several thousand flies, the researchers looked for strains that exhibited altered walking patterns compared to control animals.
Moonwalker-neurons control backward walking
Using the thermogenetic screen, the IMP-researchers isolated four lines of flies that walked backward on heat activation. They were able to track down these changes to specific nerve cells in the fly brain which they dubbed “moonwalker neurons”. They could also show that silencing the activity of these neurons using tetanus toxin rendered the flies unable to walk backward.
Among the moonwalker neurons, the activity of descending MDN-neurons is required for flies to walk backward when they encounter an obstacle. Input from MDN brain cells is sufficient to induce backward walking in flies that would otherwise walk forward. Ascending moonwalker neurons (MAN) promote persistent backward walking, possibly by inhibiting forward walking.
“This is the first identification of specific neurons that carry the command for the switch in walking direction of an insect”, says Salil Bidaye, lead author of the study. “Our findings provide a great entry point into the entire walking circuit of the fly. “Although there are obvious differences in how insects and humans walk, it is likely that there are functional analogies at a neural circuit level. Insights into the neural basis of insect walking could also generate applications in the field of robotics. To date, none of the engineered robots that are used for rescue or exploration missions can walk as robustly as animals. Understanding how insects change their walking direction at a neuronal level would reveal the mechanistic basis of achieving such robust walking behavior.
(Image credit)

neurosciencestuff:

Moonwalker Flies Backing Up

Most land animals walk forward by default, but can switch to backward walking when they sense an obstacle or danger in the path ahead. The impulse to change walking direction is likely to be transmitted by descending neurons of the brain that control local motor circuits within the central nervous system. This neuronal input can change walking direction by adjusting the order or timing of individual leg movements.

Screening for flies with altered walking patterns

In the current study, Dickson and his team aimed to understand the fly’s change in walking direction at the cellular level. Using a novel technology known as thermogenetics, they were able to identify the neurons in the brain that cause a change in locomotion. Their studies involved screening large numbers of flies with it which specific neurons were activated by heat, producing certain behaviors only when warmed to 30°C, but not at 24°C . Analysing several thousand flies, the researchers looked for strains that exhibited altered walking patterns compared to control animals.

Moonwalker-neurons control backward walking

Using the thermogenetic screen, the IMP-researchers isolated four lines of flies that walked backward on heat activation. They were able to track down these changes to specific nerve cells in the fly brain which they dubbed “moonwalker neurons”. They could also show that silencing the activity of these neurons using tetanus toxin rendered the flies unable to walk backward.

Among the moonwalker neurons, the activity of descending MDN-neurons is required for flies to walk backward when they encounter an obstacle. Input from MDN brain cells is sufficient to induce backward walking in flies that would otherwise walk forward. Ascending moonwalker neurons (MAN) promote persistent backward walking, possibly by inhibiting forward walking.

“This is the first identification of specific neurons that carry the command for the switch in walking direction of an insect”, says Salil Bidaye, lead author of the study. “Our findings provide a great entry point into the entire walking circuit of the fly. “
Although there are obvious differences in how insects and humans walk, it is likely that there are functional analogies at a neural circuit level. Insights into the neural basis of insect walking could also generate applications in the field of robotics. To date, none of the engineered robots that are used for rescue or exploration missions can walk as robustly as animals. Understanding how insects change their walking direction at a neuronal level would reveal the mechanistic basis of achieving such robust walking behavior.

(Image credit)

CAUTION: Every animal is a unique being in a unique situation and what you see on these webpages is generic and general and may not specifically apply to your animal's situation. Any responses to questions through this website similarly cannot be as precise and informed as is possible in a face-to-face assessment. Accordingly, you should not rely on anything set forth herein as the last word, and you hold Helping Pets Behave harmless from any liability whatsoever based on your reliance on the information you receive through this website.

Summer Vacation Options for Dogs: Part 2, Boarding your Dog 
by: Mary Huntsberry, MA, ACAAB
In Part 1 I talked about what to expect when traveling with a dog. If bringing your dog along on vacation is not possible, you’ll need to arrange care in your absence. Well-socialized dogs that easily adapt to new situations and get along with a variety of dogs and people may do fine in a boarding kennel. The trick is finding a good one. Below are tips for choosing a boarding kennel suitable for your special friend.
Not all states require boarding kennel inspections. The Humane Society of the United States recommends that you check your state to make sure the kennels under consideration are licensed or certified.
Poorly run kennels may expose your pet to the health and behavior problems of other animals. Look for a clean and odor free facility. Each dog should have a run to his or herself, ideally with a raised area for resting. Only one dog should be moved to a new location at a time. 
Tour the facility. Make sure indoor/outdoor runs are clean and protected from poor weather. The indoor area should be a comfortable temperature. Exercise and play areas must be escape proof and clean.
Ask about the staff. How knowledgeable are they about animal care and behavior? How is play and exercise managed?
Dogs adapt best to consistency. Leave food, a toy or two, bedding, and any medication your dog will need while you are gone.
Responsible kennel owners require proof of vaccinations, so make sure your dog is up-to-date on all shots.
Veterinary staff is an added bonus to any kennel. Some vet clinics maintain a boarding facility. With or without a veterinary amenity, the staff is there to feed, walk, play, and cuddle with your dog. 
Once you’ve made a decision on a kennel, schedule a short stay for the day or overnight. If everything works out, you’ve found the right boarding facility for your dog. When it comes time to drop him or her off, don’t make a big fuss. Simply say goodbye as you hand your pet to a qualified staff member. If you’ve done your homework, there’s no reason to be sad. Think of it as the start of a wonderful vacation for both of you! 
Check out the link below for more information on boarding your dog:
http://www.petmd.com/dog/care/evr_dg_boarding_your_dog?page=show
Mary Huntsberry, MA is an Associate Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist located in Gaithersburg, MD. Please visit www.helpingpetsbehave.com for more information on services and the variety of classes she offers.

Summer Vacation Options for Dogs: Part 2, Boarding your Dog 

by: Mary Huntsberry, MA, ACAAB

In Part 1 I talked about what to expect when traveling with a dog. If bringing your dog along on vacation is not possible, you’ll need to arrange care in your absence. Well-socialized dogs that easily adapt to new situations and get along with a variety of dogs and people may do fine in a boarding kennel. The trick is finding a good one. Below are tips for choosing a boarding kennel suitable for your special friend.

  • Not all states require boarding kennel inspections. The Humane Society of the United States recommends that you check your state to make sure the kennels under consideration are licensed or certified.
  • Poorly run kennels may expose your pet to the health and behavior problems of other animals. Look for a clean and odor free facility. Each dog should have a run to his or herself, ideally with a raised area for resting. Only one dog should be moved to a new location at a time. 
  • Tour the facility. Make sure indoor/outdoor runs are clean and protected from poor weather. The indoor area should be a comfortable temperature. Exercise and play areas must be escape proof and clean.
  • Ask about the staff. How knowledgeable are they about animal care and behavior? How is play and exercise managed?
  • Dogs adapt best to consistency. Leave food, a toy or two, bedding, and any medication your dog will need while you are gone.
  • Responsible kennel owners require proof of vaccinations, so make sure your dog is up-to-date on all shots.
  • Veterinary staff is an added bonus to any kennel. Some vet clinics maintain a boarding facility. With or without a veterinary amenity, the staff is there to feed, walk, play, and cuddle with your dog. 

Once you’ve made a decision on a kennel, schedule a short stay for the day or overnight. If everything works out, you’ve found the right boarding facility for your dog. When it comes time to drop him or her off, don’t make a big fuss. Simply say goodbye as you hand your pet to a qualified staff member. If you’ve done your homework, there’s no reason to be sad. Think of it as the start of a wonderful vacation for both of you! 

Check out the link below for more information on boarding your dog:

http://www.petmd.com/dog/care/evr_dg_boarding_your_dog?page=show

Mary Huntsberry, MA is an Associate Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist located in Gaithersburg, MD. Please visit www.helpingpetsbehave.com for more information on services and the variety of classes she offers.

CAUTION: Every animal is a unique being in a unique situation and what you see on these webpages is generic and general and may not specifically apply to your animal's situation. Any responses to questions through this website similarly cannot be as precise and informed as is possible in a face-to-face assessment. Accordingly, you should not rely on anything set forth herein as the last word, and you hold Helping Pets Behave harmless from any liability whatsoever based on your reliance on the information you receive through this website.

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